clock menu more-arrow no yes

Filed under:

Must-Read Books on the Vancouver Canucks

New, comments
Boston Bruins v Vancouver Canucks

As is the yearly tradition, hockey fans and pundits have come upon the dog days of summer, wherein conversation is dominated by rehashed themes or novelty topics. The season will (thankfully) soon be upon us, but in the meantime, fans need something to keep their hockey appetites appeased. For Canucks fans, there may be no better pastime then delving into these four books that touch on varying areas of the team’s history, and in some senses, allows them to better understand the current state of the franchise.

Ice Storm by Bruce Dowbiggin

In Ice Storm, Bruce Dowbiggin gives Canucks fans an inside look on the greatest team in franchise history (that, of course, being the 2011 edition of the club). Detailing Mike Gillis’ rise to power and the franchise’s grappling with near victory, it’s an intimate and detailed read that is a necessary addition to the bookshelf for any Canucks fan. Indeed, the story recounted by Dowbiggin allows one to better understand the foundations of the 2011 club, and the inside dynamics of how it came to be.

100 Things Every Canucks Fan Should or Know or Do Before They Die by Mike Halford and Thomas Drance

A book full of lively, bite-sized Canucks tidbits delivered writers of Canucks past and present, Thomas Drance and Mike Halford, is a delightful read for any fan. Full of historical tidbits, franchise lore, and references known only to the hardcores of the fanbase. With the rich humour and style expected from both Drance and Halford, fans get an idea of various moments in franchise history that have come to define it over the years. An excellent primer for both longtime fans, and those just beginning their journey in Canucks fandom.

Quinn by Dan Robson

A detailed outlook on the life and career of former Canucks head coach and Ring of Honour inductee Pat Quinn, Dan Robson offers a fulfilling read important to the history of the club. With a narrative arching from his budding career as a pro athlete, to his academic pursuits, to his prestigious career in coaching, Robson offers an in-depth look into both Pat Quinn the professional, and Pat Quinn the man. With a lens that offers deep insight into Quinn’s style and personality, Robson has crafted a memorable work tackling one of the most important figures in the history of the Vancouver Canucks.

Pavel Bure: The Riddle of the Russian Rocket by Kerry Banks

What makes Kerry Banks’ detailed account of the career of the Canucks’ first true superstar so intriguing is the acknowledgement of the broader societal context within which his rise took place. With a unique and in-depth depiction of the struggles faced by Russians looking to join the National Hockey League, one is able to grapple with the realities faced by many, including members of the Canucks. Banks also paints a vivid picture of Bure’s time with the Canucks, effectively conveying both the thrilling highs and the crushing lows of the Bure era. Indeed, Banks’ effort comes recommended for Canucks — and hockey fans — both young and old.